Proof That We Are Living In The Future

the_futureI am on a flight home and typing this from 38,000 feet on an iPad with a Bluetooth keyboard. Four years ago this would have been the future and now it’s here and commonplace. I often think our society isn’t progressing as fast as it could be.  After all, shouldn’t we have flying cars and watches that talk by now?

The flying cars may still be a few years off but Samsung just released the Galaxy Gear Watch. It connects to a Galaxy Note 3, allows the user to see incoming alerts and talk via the watch.  If that wasn’t enough, it even has a camera built into the band. On that note, we may actually be living in the future.

I have even better news for you.  Yesterday I caught a glimpse of the future and it is amazing. I was lucky enough to attend the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Symposium and Awards. I learned all kinds of fascinating things.  For example, did you know that there’s a case for an iPhone that can perform an EKG (a measurement of the heart’s electrical activity) from anywhere in the world?

What impressed me the most was a printer.  Now we are all familiar with printers that spit out flat sheets of paper.  What I’m talking about is a 3D printer.  3D printing is when layer upon layer is printed until an object is built. Common things I’ve seen printed are cell phone cases, bottle openers and toys for children.

Here’s where the amazing starts.  In the new era of 3D printing, Dr. Lawrence Bonassar of Cornell University explained that his scientists have actually found a way to print living tissue. I watched as a human ear was printed for a young girl who was born without one. It was quite possibly the most fascinating thing I’ve ever witnessed in my entire life. These same doctors have also printed cartilage that will in the future be surgically implanted between a persons vertebra.

Until yesterday, I had no idea 3D tissue printing was possible let alone the printing of live cells.  So when a technology pundit like myself says society isn’t moving fast enough, tell them they’re wrong.  We are in fact living in the future.   Keep in mind that I’m submitting this article to be edited via a wireless Internet connection while traveling on an airplane at 600 miles per hour!