Use Call Forwarding To Save On Roaming

Alon Cohen our CTO wanted me to share his recent experience with all our readers.  Alon is traveling abroad and called his cell phone carrier asking them to activate the regular plan he’s always used when traveling outside the US, problem is they don’t have it any more.  Now Alon has to pay ¢50 per minute on a 15 minute plan working out to be $30 for their lowest bucket.  SMS is $10 for 50 messages and internet usage is $30 for 120mb.  Plus he has to pay for the whole month whether he uses it or not.  In the past the carrier has always prorated Alon’s bill and only charge him for the time he was traveling, it’s just been a courtesy but they won’t do it any longer.  To top it all off he asked to turn off incoming voice calls during his trip and they won’t any more.  So if someone calls his cell phone and even if he doesn’t answer he’s still charged for 1 minute, that can add up quickly for someone that gets a lot of calls.

Alon came up with his own solution.  He forwarded his cell phone voice calls to his Phone.com number which he can set up so it only rings when he’s on WiFi (saving him the roaming minute fee) and will have all voicemail transcribed and emailed to him if he misses the calls or decides not to answer.  Now he won’t be charged for any incoming calls.

This is a great solution for our customers wanting to save some money when they go abroad but still need to be connected.  I suggest utilizing Phone.com for this, it will save you a world or pain when your cell phone bill arrives after your trip.

Alon also wanted me to include that if you decide to get a local sim card in the country you’re visiting Phone.com can forward your incoming calls to that number at a VERY reduced price compared to the cell phone carriers.  The carrier will charge Alon ¢50/min to roam on his vacation and Phone.com charges ¢4/min to forward your calls to a local cell phone number where Alon is vacationing.  That will be hard to beat…

Do you have any bill shock horror stories from roaming abroad?  We’d love to hear about them on Twitter or Facebook.