Phone.com’s Call Handling Rules Brought My Father In Law Home Safe

I’d like to talk to you today as a grateful Phone.com user and not as an employee. Yesterday was a bit harrowing for my family. My father in law has Dementia and it’s sadly progressing quickly. Yesterday afternoon we couldn’t reach him. We called the home phone and cell phone again and again and got no answer. My mother in law rushed home from my house hoping he was there but he wasn’t. He went out and left his cell phone at home (I still don’t know why). We were trying to wait patiently but it wasn’t going well. We made reservations for dinner expecting him to just show up at home and be ready to eat.

When that didn’t happen we really started to worry and my mother in law started phoning friends. She ultimately went out to talk to neighbors. But here’s where Phone.com comes in, as soon as things escalated I got on the Phone.com website and changed my in laws phone settings. They have been using Phone.com for a while now and calls typically ring through to their ATA and home phone. What I did thanks to the awesome control panel was change the call handling rules. Calls still rang at their home but I also set them to ring on my mother in laws cell phone and my wife’s cell phone. We didn’t care who answered the phone but just hoped to get a call telling us he’s ok.

Luckily we did come to find out my father in law went to a gas station to ask for directions and the cashier called the police knowing that he shouldn’t be roaming the streets. The police arrived and called the home number reaching my mother in law on her cell phone only because the call routing was changed allowing for this to happen. In the end the police officer was kind enough to drive my father in law home and make sure he got in safely. Thank you to the Anaheim Police Department and thank you Phone.com for letting me set the home phone number to ring on my mother in laws cell phone. In my mind there is no doubt this would have gone differently if no one answered that call ringing in an empty house. Phone.com was a key piece to this happy conclusion.